North Loop Loft Renovations: Then and Now

5 Historic Minneapolis Warehouse Renovations

Crowd of people in warehouse district

Minneapolis has gone through somewhat of a renaissance over the past decade or so. Industrial buildings and warehouses that the city was built on have been renovated and converted into amazing urban dwellings. Here’s a list of my Top 5 historic renovations in the North Loop neighborhood. 

700 Washington Avenue N

One of the tallest structures in the Warehouse District, the name Tower Lofts comes from the prominent tower rising above the 6th floor roof. Before becoming the Tower Lofts this building was one of the largest artist’s coops in the Warehouse District, better known as the Studios @ 700.  The first residential occupancy was actually in 1982.

Then

Tower Lofts Yesterday
Gamble-Skogmo Building, Flour City Brush Company Building, Northern Bag Company Building, Studios @ 700

Built: 1920

Architect: Hewitt & Brown

Style: Medieval Revival

Now

Tower Lofts Live Work

Tower Lofts

Renovated: 2004

Architect: Elness Swenson Graham Architects

Style: Warehouse Loft, Live/Work, Open Floor Plan, Concrete Floors, 13 ft Cielings

525 3rd Street North

The Bookmen Lofts is one of the few historic renovations in the North Loop where the architect was able to build the addition of a 6th floor bump out/private rooftop deck for the top floor penthouse units.

Then

Bookmen Yesterday

Bookmen Printing Building, IWS Warehouse, Slocum Bergen Building, Red and White Food Stores Warehouse

Built: 1914

Architect: Long, Lamoreaux & Long

Style: Commercial

Now

Bookmen Lofts Penthouse

Bookmen Lofts

Renovated: 2004

Architect: James Dayton Design, Ltd.

Style: Warehouse Loft, Brick Walls, Concrete Floors

801 Washington Avenue N

801 Washington was originally home to a farm implement factory, a Studebaker Packard showroom and Shafer Refrigeration. The most recent tenant prior to the loft renovation was an Antiques dealer, Architectural Antiques.

Then

801 Washington

Pence Auto Co.

Built: 1914

Architect: John Wunder Co.

Style: Classical Revival

Now

801 Washington Today
801 Washington Ave Lofts

Renovated: 2003

Architect: Meyer Scherer Rockcastle Architects

Style: Warehouse Loft, Brick Walls, Wood Floors, Exposed Timber, Single and  Multi-Level 

748 3rd Ave N 

The City of Minneapolis apparently approved a plan to add two story penthouses atop the Hershel building which would have increased the height from 6 floors to 8 floors, but this never came together.

Then

Herschel mfg
Herschel Roth Manufacturing Co..

Built: 1915

Architect: Walter H. Wheeler.

Style: Commercial

Now

Herschel Lofts Minneapolis
Herschel Lofts

Renovated: 2006

Architect: Tanek Inc.

Style: Warehouse Loft, Brick Walls, Hardwood Floors

716 1st St. N.

In the early 1980’s the Itasca Lofts became the first warehouse conversion from industrial use to business and residential lofts in Minneapolis. 

Then

Warehouse district 2
Itasca Warehouse

Built: 1886

Architect: Long & Kees

Style: Richardsonian Romanesque

Now

The Itasca
The Itasca

Renovated: 1981

Architect: Edwins & Halden

Style: Warehouse Loft, Timber Loft, Brick Walls

via Mike Seebinger @ south-of-canada

More historic North Loop photos @ “A Look Back at the North Loop: Photo Montage

A Look Back at The North Loop/Warehouse District; Photo Montage

Many of us have gotten to know and love the North Loop/Warehouse District as it is today.  Multiple condo developments, award winning restaurants, dive bars and of course the new Twins Stadium are all pretty recent developments in the area, but how did it look pre condo boom?

The North Loop was mainly an industrial area. Railroad yards and numerous warehouses and factories were the bulk of the territory.

When one thought about the warehouse district they may have associated it with the railroad transportation network.  It was the hub connecting Minneapolis with the rest of the Midwest and the rest of the country.   Wholesale, storage of goods related to milling and manufacturing were the most common uses of the numerous warehouses.

Today the neighborhood has a very different feel so it is cool to look back and reflect for a minute.  Enjoy the photo collection cherry picked from the Minnesota Historic Society’s website.

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